TOEFL Insider #108

BIG News: ETS announces a new TOEFL test

Happy Friday TOEFL Insiders;

Here is your weekly summary of tips and resources in the TOEFL® world.

But first up, the next round of group classes is starting Wednesday, March 3rd.

Each class is maxed out at 8 students so we make sure each one of you gets the attention you need for the score you want.

Listening Group Classes:

  • Sun & Wed – 6 pm EST / 5 pm CST, beginning March 3rd

Learn more about the Group Classes for the Listening Section of the TOEFL® Test.

Speaking Group Classes:

  • Group A: Sun & Wed – 7 pm EST / 6 pm CST, beginning March 3rd

Learn more about the Group Classes for the Speaking Section of the TOEFL® Test.

Writing Group Classes:

  • Group A: Wed & Fri – 2 pm EST / 1 pm CST, beginning March 3rd

Learn more about the Group Classes for the Writing Section of the TOEFL® Test.

If you have any questions, you can always contact our Head of Communications, Marina, at [email protected]

 

TOEFL News

Lots to talk about this week. I tried to sum up all of the relevant information in this video.


Here are a few additional links to ETS’ official site if you want to read more:

Feel free to let us know if you have any questions!

TOEFL Tips

Here’s a tip from Katie Reaburn, one of our TOEFL Teachers.

Katie
Reaburn

“When you have to answer the independent question in the speaking or writing section, you will probably give a personal example, and that personal example will be in the past tense. So, it is crucial that you practice speaking and writing in the past.

This could be more difficult than it sounds. Many of our TOEFL students mix verb tenses when writing or speaking about past events.

This activity will help you improve your speaking and writing verb tense usage:

Step 1 – Find a sport you are interested in and watch a past event;
Step 2 – While you are watching, mute the sound (that’s right, put it on mute);
Step 3 – Act like a commentator and describe what happened (in the past);
Step 4 – Be sure to record your commentary so you can review your speaking;
Step 5 – Listen back to your commentary and pay close attention to your verbs.

Example (American football) : The Giants and the Eagles played at Giants’ stadium. It was first down. The quarterback had plenty of time. Number 81 threw the ball downfield to number 7. They picked up 28 yards and got the first down. On second down, they ran the ball for 20 more yards. On third down, they scored a touchdown! But when they tried to score the extra point, the other team’s defense blocked the kick, so they missed their chance to score.

I know, American football vocabulary is weird!

But have fun with this. Pick a sport and watch a short clip. You could even mix up this activity and practice using only the present tense or even employing the correct articles. Pick one skill you would like to work on and become a sportscaster.

Since this activity requires active participation and active thought, it will make you aware of those past-tense verbs, which is exactly what you will need to do on TOEFL test day.”
– Katie

TOEFL Resources

There are hundreds of thousands of words in English, but which do you have to know for the TOEFL?

The Academic Word List consists of 570 of the most important words you have to know for the TOEFL. Academic vocabulary is tough, but it doesn’t have to be. Check out this list and learn which words you need to know on test day.

Stay safe and good luck!

Comment below or reply to the original email if you want to get in touch.

We are here to help you get your TOEFL score as quickly and easily as possible.

— Josh MacPherson
Head Instructor at TST Prep

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